Listening – Day 17

Exploring the XXth Century

Messiaen was 31 years old when France entered World War II. He was captured by the German army in June 1940 and imprisoned in Stalag VIII-A, a prisoner-of-war camp in Görlitz, Germany (now Zgorzelec, Poland). While in transit to the camp, Messiaen showed the clarinetist Henri Akoka, also a prisoner, the sketches for what would become Abîme des oiseaux. Two other professional musicians, violinist Jean le Boulaire and cellist Étienne Pasquier, were among his fellow prisoners, and after he managed to obtain some paper and a small pencil from a sympathetic guard (Carl-Albert Brüll, 1902-1989), Messiaen wrote a short trio for them; this piece developed into the Quatuor for the same trio with himself at the piano. The combination of instruments is unusual, but not without precedent: Walter Rabl had composed for it in 1896, as had Paul Hindemith in 1938.

The quartet was premiered at the camp, outdoors and in the rain, on 15 January 1941. The musicians had decrepit instruments and an audience of about 400 fellow prisoners and guards.[1] Messiaen later recalled: “Never was I listened to with such rapt attention and comprehension.”

Source

OLIVIER MESSIAEN

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4 thoughts on “Listening – Day 17

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    1. This was a difficult listening day. You passed the test brilliantly! 😀 You have found the appropriate adjectives for this piece that is called “Quartet for the End of Time”…just brilliant. I would’ve said “fear”, but yours are better. 🙂

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